Chia seeds, avocado, ginger, turmeric — many people are acquainted with those common superfoods, which get a lot of attention from wellness and health enthusiasts. However, what about other famous superfoods?

Advertisement

1. The purple sweet potato.

This potato is also referred to as the Okinawan potato, grown and consumed by the Okinawan people of Japan. This specific part of Japan is famous for good health and longevity, and is classified as a”Blue Zone,” a term coined by writer and National Geographic fellow Dan Buettner. Blue Zones are communities of people who live exceptionally long lives (frequently in their 100s) and aren’t influenced by any of the chronic diseases–such as cancer and heart disease–which plague the rest of the planet. Researchers have been studying these regions of the world, attempting to comprehend how their lifestyle and diet promote these excellent health and longevity.

The purple sweet potato is a staple in the Okinawa diet. It’s exceptionally delicious and incredibly rich in antioxidants. This vibrant purple color is a fantastic hint that it includes elevated levels of the exceptional antioxidant anthocyanin. This specific phytochemical has been studied and found to decrease oxidative stress, help combat free radicals, and shield the tissues in our body from diseases like cancer. So be on the watch for this stunning tubers!

2. Black radishes.

Another significant and growing tendency is black foods. And it is no wonder that they are becoming popular, since the science behind their health benefits is fairly strong. One type of black food–the black radish–is a unique and an enjoyable alternative to its red cousin. A black radish can be bigger than a grapefruit and has quite a strong sulfur-like taste. The crispness can be quite refreshing in a raw green salad with some citrus added for contrast. Black radish is said to include four times the amount of the cancer-fighting sulfur compound known as glucosinolates.

3. Beluga lentils.

These are a really delicate and lovely black lentil that resembles beluga caviar (thus the title ). They’re a great source of vegan protein and are extremely rich in the powerful antioxidant anthocyanin. This antioxidant was demonstrated to be useful for brain function and for combating cancer. These beautiful lentils are high in fiber and protein; a half-cup of cooked beluga lentils contains approximately 9 grams of protein, 8 grams of fiber, and just 112 calories. These are wonderful to cook quickly and then keep at a glass container in the fridge to add to salads, soups, or sautés.